Saturday, February 12, 2011

Meaning of Karate Belts





What Is the Meaning of Karate Belts?






For those unfamiliar with the belt system in karate, it may seem like an arbitrary assignment of colors to determine rank. While the belts to distinguish practitioners is based on a determined mastery of skill, there are specific reasons why a beginner starts with a white belt and a master achieves a black belt. Karate itself is a blend of two fighting techniques: one of fighting effectiveness and the other based on philosophical teachings. It has developed into a discipline with a belt system to help students and instructors keep track of progress. Belt order can vary among disciplines. The order for the Kyukushin Karate discipline is similar to many ranking systems for North American karate.

White
For many cultures, white is a symbol of purity. Most who start the art of karate are naive to the work and discipline that will be required for mastery and are thus pure. It is the start of the journey from the one end of innocents to mastery, just as one can see the various layers of a color spectrum. This level denotes the first ideas of karate being introduced.
Orange
The orange belt represents stability. The kata, or pattern of movements, is practiced with basic postures, punches, blocks and kicks. All other methods learned in higher belts build on the basic principles of the white and orange belts.
Blue
Once a student has mastered the basics and is stable in his form, he must learn to adapt as situations require him to. This is the purpose of the blue belt, which represents fluidity and adaptability. With fluidity comes the joy in training, greater strength and confidence of mind over body.
Yellow
This is the belt where students transform from beginners to developing true skill in the art of karate. The belt represents an assertion of one's energy. Students learn to master the "tanden," otherwise known as the central point of gravity just below the navel. In this mastery, greater control over the body's energy is accomplished.
Green
The green belt is the transition from beginner to true follower of the martial art. The students are humbled as training becomes even more serious. With this transition comes a great flow of emotion and sensitivity as they train in the advance kata and belt methods.
Brown
Brown belts are nearing mastery. As a result, they are required to be both practical and creative by creating techniques and katas. This is where confidence soars as one's own personality is integrated with the many techniques already learned.
Black
A black belt is the pinnacle of achievement in the martial arts. Many will work years to develop the mastery for this attainment. In reality, the belt is not the ultimate goal but instead a new beginning for a journey to start once again from the beginning with a new self-awareness. It represents a state of being and personal growth.

What Is the Meaning of Karate Belts?






For those unfamiliar with the belt system in karate, it may seem like an arbitrary assignment of colors to determine rank. While the belts to distinguish practitioners is based on a determined mastery of skill, there are specific reasons why a beginner starts with a white belt and a master achieves a black belt. Karate itself is a blend of two fighting techniques: one of fighting effectiveness and the other based on philosophical teachings. It has developed into a discipline with a belt system to help students and instructors keep track of progress. Belt order can vary among disciplines. The order for the Kyukushin Karate discipline is similar to many ranking systems for North American karate.

White
For many cultures, white is a symbol of purity. Most who start the art of karate are naive to the work and discipline that will be required for mastery and are thus pure. It is the start of the journey from the one end of innocents to mastery, just as one can see the various layers of a color spectrum. This level denotes the first ideas of karate being introduced.
Orange
The orange belt represents stability. The kata, or pattern of movements, is practiced with basic postures, punches, blocks and kicks. All other methods learned in higher belts build on the basic principles of the white and orange belts.
Blue
Once a student has mastered the basics and is stable in his form, he must learn to adapt as situations require him to. This is the purpose of the blue belt, which represents fluidity and adaptability. With fluidity comes the joy in training, greater strength and confidence of mind over body.
Yellow
This is the belt where students transform from beginners to developing true skill in the art of karate. The belt represents an assertion of one's energy. Students learn to master the "tanden," otherwise known as the central point of gravity just below the navel. In this mastery, greater control over the body's energy is accomplished.
Green
The green belt is the transition from beginner to true follower of the martial art. The students are humbled as training becomes even more serious. With this transition comes a great flow of emotion and sensitivity as they train in the advance kata and belt methods.
Brown
Brown belts are nearing mastery. As a result, they are required to be both practical and creative by creating techniques and katas. This is where confidence soars as one's own personality is integrated with the many techniques already learned.
Black
A black belt is the pinnacle of achievement in the martial arts. Many will work years to develop the mastery for this attainment. In reality, the belt is not the ultimate goal but instead a new beginning for a journey to start once again from the beginning with a new self-awareness. It represents a state of being and personal growth.

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